I started the Futures Salon to get a small cohort of people interested in discussing and thinking ahead for our future as a species.   We discuss, debate, and raise awareness about scientific, cultural, technological, and humanitarian issues that will affect all of humanity in the coming decades.  As a small Seattle-based group, I felt the inclusion of the Space Needle was almost a prerequisite. Even today, it looks futuristic and not at all a structure from the 1960s, which it is. It's optimistic 60s futurism can be considered to be retrofuturism in today's argot.  As a designer, I decided to pursue the retrofuturistic aesthetic to try and recapture the optimism of the 60s about our future, which I share as an individual.   In pursuing that vibe, I've used some pastel blues and oranges for the 60s effect, leaving the Needle, the light grid, and modern typeface to do the heavy lifting for the futurism. 

Futures Salon

The Futures Salon is a project I've tried to get going for a while. The idea is to get a small group of smart people together to have deep, philosophical conversations about the future of humanity. Its first iteration was called "The Futurists," and I wanted to be a larger and more public organization. 

Failing that, this is the second iteration of my idea. I designed the logo to be reflective of my personal optimism about the future. 

 I started the Futures Salon to get a small cohort of people interested in discussing and thinking ahead for our future as a species.   We discuss, debate, and raise awareness about scientific, cultural, technological, and humanitarian issues that will affect all of humanity in the coming decades.  As a small Seattle-based group, I felt the inclusion of the Space Needle was almost a prerequisite. Even today, it looks futuristic and not at all a structure from the 1960s, which it is. It's optimistic 60s futurism can be considered to be retrofuturism in today's argot.  As a designer, I decided to pursue the retrofuturistic aesthetic to try and recapture the optimism of the 60s about our future, which I share as an individual.   In pursuing that vibe, I've used some pastel blues and oranges for the 60s effect, leaving the Needle, the light grid, and modern typeface to do the heavy lifting for the futurism. 

I started the Futures Salon to get a small cohort of people interested in discussing and thinking ahead for our future as a species. 

We discuss, debate, and raise awareness about scientific, cultural, technological, and humanitarian issues that will affect all of humanity in the coming decades.

As a small Seattle-based group, I felt the inclusion of the Space Needle was almost a prerequisite. Even today, it looks futuristic and not at all a structure from the 1960s, which it is. It's optimistic 60s futurism can be considered to be retrofuturism in today's argot.

As a designer, I decided to pursue the retrofuturistic aesthetic to try and recapture the optimism of the 60s about our future, which I share as an individual. 

In pursuing that vibe, I've used some pastel blues and oranges for the 60s effect, leaving the Needle, the light grid, and modern typeface to do the heavy lifting for the futurism. 

Futures Salon logo.jpg